Schedule Of Events: Crossing The Boundaries XXIII: Cut and Paste

Crossing the Boundaries XXIII: Cut and Paste

Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference Presented by the Art History Graduate Student Union at Binghamton University

Click here for a printable schedule!

Friday, March 27, 2015

1:00-2:15 | Undergraduate Panel | Location: Binghamton University Art Museum (Fine Arts Building) Lower Galleries

  • Colleen Stapleton, “Collaged Anonymity: A Portrait of Delay”
  • Kara Nandin, “Ojibwa Birchbark Scrolls and Rock Art: The Misappropriation of Forms in Nineteenth-Century Aesthetic”
  • Daniel Bontempi, “Duane Hanson: A Study of Modernist Expression through Minimalism and Post-Minimalism”

2:15-2:30 | Break

2:30-3:45 | Panel 1: Sound, Space, Time | Location: Binghamton University Art Museum (Fine Arts Building) Lower Galleries | Moderator: Amanda Beardsley

  • Alana Wolf-Johnson, University of Rochester, “Re-Recording History: Jacob Kirkegaard’s Four Rooms and the Sonic Unconscious”
  • Mopelola Ogunbowale, University at Buffalo, “Cutting and Pasting the ‘Riddim’: A Case Study of Diaspora Music in Urban Lagos”
  • Elise Trucks, Binghamton University, “Expansive Collaborations: Carolee Schneemann, James Tenney and 1960s Experimental Arts”

3:45-4:00 | Break

4:00 | Keynote Address | Location: Fine Arts 258

Andrés Mario Zervigón, Associate Professor of Art History, Rutgers University, “Die Arbeiter-Illustrierte Zeitung — The Worker’s Illustrated Magazine, 1921-1938: The Cut and Paste of Germany’s Other Avant-Garde” Click here to read the abstract!

5:00-7:00 | Opening Reception: “The Inner Landscape of Dance: Photographs by Barbara Morgan 1935-1944” | Location: University Art Museum

6:30 | Dinner | Thai Basil Restaurant, 29 Washington Ave., Endicott, NY

Saturday, March 28, 2015

Location: All Saturday panels will take place in Fine Arts 258, and all meals will take place in the adjacent Fine Arts Grand Corridor

9:00-9:30 | Breakfast | Fine Arts Grand Corridor

9:30-10:45 | Panel 2: Assemblage, Construction, Contingency | Moderator: Nicole Wagner

  • Addie Gordon, Binghamton University, “‘Rewriting the Past’: Peter Eisenman’s City of Culture, Galicia”
  • Rachel Julia Engler, Columbia University, “A Perfect Kind of Incoherence: Theo van Doesburg’s Dada Geometries”
  • Allison Leigh, The Cooper Union, “Typological Montage in the Nineteenth Century: The Alienation of Everyday Life”

10:45-11:00 | Break

11:00-12:15 | Panel 3: Texts of Resistance | Moderator: Lena Mei

  • Andrea Ennis-Booth, University of Toronto, “Heisler’s Alphabet: Between Interpretation and the Threat of Destruction”
  • Wylie Schwartz, Binghamton University, “Asger Jorn’s Collective Creating”
  • Debora Faccion, Binghamton University, “Malasartes: The Short Life of an Art Magazine in Brazil”

12:15-1:15 | Lunch | Fine Arts Grand Corridor

1:15-2:30 | Panel 4: Books and Materiality | Moderator: Zohre Soltani

  • Amy Breimeier, University of Massachusetts Amherst, “Grace Fisher and the Art of the Commonplace Book”
  • Victoria Gao, University of Rochester, “Image and Materiality: Man Ray’s Atget Album”
  • Olivia Crough, Harvard University, “Glue as Such: The Collaged Books of Aleksei Kruchenykh and Olga Rozanova, 1915-1917”

2:30-2:45 | Break

2:45-4:00 | Panel 5: American Narratives | Moderator: Josh T. Franco

  • Kasia A. Kieca, Binghamton University, “Industrial Visions: The Politics of Assemblage in Lewis Hine’s Men at Work (1932)”
  • Nushelle de Silva, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, “Assembling ‘Smallness’ at the American Small Industries Exhibition, Ceylon 1961”
  • Evelyn Kreutzer, Northwestern University,  “Intermediality and Montage in the Depiction of the 9/11 Trauma: Observations on Works by Carolee Schneemann, Galway Kinnell and John Adams.”

4:00-4:30 | Break

4:30 | Keynote Address | Fine Arts 258

Kevin Hatch, Assistant Professor of Art History, Binghamton University, “‘O Mexico/My Own’: The Semina Circle Encounters Mexico” Click here to read the abstract!

7:00 | Closing Reception | 25 Birch St., Binghamton, NY

Call for Papers: CTB 2015

CutandPaste

We are pleased to announce the theme for our twenty-third annual conference: Cut and Paste!

Keynote Speakers:

Andrés Mario Zervigón, Rutgers University

Kevin Hatch, Binghamton University

CALL FOR PAPERS

The phrase “cut and paste,” in its most fundamental definition, is the process of selecting and combining fragments. Inspired by an established commitment to critical research, this year’s conference aims to explore the assortment of thematic, methodological, and sociopolitical interpretations derived from the traditional concept of extracting and adhering.

The twenty-third annual Crossing The Boundaries Conference, hosted by the Art History Graduate Student Union at Binghamton University, invites submissions from any historical or disciplinary approaches that involve a literal or conceptual appropriation achieved through cutting and pasting.

Potential topics might include (but are not limited to):

  • Collage, bricolage, assemblage, montage
  • Authorship, plagiarism, imitation
  • Censorship and editing
  • Fragments / Fragmentation
  • Cultural traditions and historical change
  • Recontextualization
  • Sociopolitcal statements
  • Accumulation and composites of found objects
  • Invention or production through appropriation

Proposals for individual papers (20 minutes maximum) should be no more than 250 words in length and may be sent by email, with a current graduate level CV, to binghamtonctb@gmail.com (Attn: Proposal). We also welcome proposals for integrated panels. Panel organizers should describe the theme of the panel and send abstracts with names and affiliations of all participants along with current CVs. A panel should consist of no more than three papers, each twenty minutes in length. Deadline for submissions is January 30, 2015.

Keynote: Ariella Azoulay, “Revolutionary Moments and State Violence”

AriellaAzoulay_4

Ariella Azoulay is an Assistant Professor of comparative literature and modern culture and media in Brown University. She will present her talk on Saturday, April 27, 2013, 6:15pm.



Abstract:

A few years ago, when I began my research on the revolutions of the 18th century, I was guided by the intuition that revolution is a special type of language, and created an archive of its different manifestations. This intuition was initially based on my reading of texts and pamphlets written by protestors deprived of civil rights – mainly women and blacks, alongside images from the same context. The archive became a laboratory for further exploration of this intuition. I started by identifying statements, forms, body gestures, grammar and rules, and re-conceptualizing some of the notions related to the discourse of revolution. Through a reading of a few photos, I’ll historicize the link between revolution and violence, and question its unavoidability.

rivka levi evacuation_for_Ariella

Keynote: Prof. Julia Walker, “Allegory/Archipelago: Crossing Berlin’s Boundaries”

CTB_Julia

Julia Walker is Assistant Professor of Art History at Binghamton University. Her talk, titled “Allegory/Archipelago: Crossing Berlin’s Boundaries,” will be held on Friday, April 26, 2013, at 5:30pm.

Abstract:

Upon winning the commission to master plan Berlin’s new government district, Axel Schultes remarked, “the challenge posed by the competition was to coax the soul out of the Spreebogen, the genius loci, to pour its historical and spatial dimensions into the mold of a new architectural allegory.” Schultes and his partner, Charlotte Frank, had generated public enthusiasm with a design anchored by a Band des Bundes (or “ribbon of federal buildings”) spanning the Spree River twice and traversing the former boundary between east and west. Supporters saw the plan as symbolically repairing the torn urban fabric and suturing together the formerly divided city. Indeed, Schultes and Frank’s design thematized the Spreebogen’s status as a boundary that needed somehow to be crossed—a historical zone of rupture, movement, and surveillance, from the course of the Berlin Wall along the Spree to the spectral presence of Albert Speer’s imposing north-south boulevard. Yet Schultes’s reflection that the Spreebogen’s vexed history must be refigured as a “new architectural allegory” also reveals that the boundary between his plan and its precedents is theoretical as well as historical. Schultes and Frank’s postmodern approach to urban planning draws heavily on the thinking of Rem Koolhaas and O. M. Ungers, who had planned in 1977 to reconfigure Berlin as the “green archipelago,” a decentralized, fragmented, and dispersed city in which islands of architectural intensity floated in depopulated green space. In both the allegory and the archipelago, the unified city is hardly unified, but rather diffuse and inchoate.

band_entwurf_schultes_frank_800_for_Julia