#CTB13: John Tagg and Ariella Azoulay in Conversation

AHGSU is delighted to present a conversation between Prof. John Tagg (Binghamton University) and this year’s keynote speaker, Ariella Azoulay (Brown University).

JTphotoThe conversation will take place on Friday, April 26, 2013, at 3:30, in the Fine Arts Museum. The event is free and open to the public. A live stream will be made available through our website.

Azoulay’s keynote address will be held on Saturday at 5:00, in FA 258. Read the abstract here.

Ariella AzoulayThe event will be followed by a reception.
The keynote address by Juiia Walker will be held at 5:30, in FA 258.
Read her abstract here.

#CTB13: Conference Schedule

Crossing the Boundaries XXI: DIS/PLACE
April 26-27, 2013

Art History Graduate Student Union Annual Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference Binghamton University

Keynote Speakers:

Ariella Azoulay, Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature and Modern Culture and Media, Brown University

Julia Walker, Assistant Professor, Art History, Binghamton University

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FRIDAY, APRIL 26
(All panels located in the University Art Museum)

11:00 – 12:00   Undergraduate Panel
Moderator: Katerina Acuna
The Naturally Lit Cube: Dia:Beacon’s Natural Light and Perceptual Experience
Alex Feim

Openings and Closures, Doorways to Expression in State Mediated China. Zhang Dali’s Dialogue
Eric Wuu

The Necessity of Thought: Thomas Hirschhorn’s Bataille Monument
Rachel Rapp

12:00 – 12:30   LUNCH   (Rosefsky Corridor)

12:30 – 1:45   Performance & Performative Spaces
Moderator: Josh Franco

Persepolis 2530: Viewing the Modern Ruins at Persepolis
Maria Salva, Binghamton University

Imagibility and Communicability in Archigram’s City Projects
Joo Yun Lee, Stony Brook University

Recontextualizing the Atomic Southwest
Deanna Sheward, New York University

The Aesthetics of Indifference: Andy Warhol’s 1967 Utah ‘Hoax’ as Performance and Self-Portraiture
Scotti Hill, University of Utah

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Keynote: Ariella Azoulay, “Revolutionary Moments and State Violence”

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Ariella Azoulay is an Assistant Professor of comparative literature and modern culture and media in Brown University. She will present her talk on Saturday, April 27, 2013, 6:15pm.



Abstract:

A few years ago, when I began my research on the revolutions of the 18th century, I was guided by the intuition that revolution is a special type of language, and created an archive of its different manifestations. This intuition was initially based on my reading of texts and pamphlets written by protestors deprived of civil rights – mainly women and blacks, alongside images from the same context. The archive became a laboratory for further exploration of this intuition. I started by identifying statements, forms, body gestures, grammar and rules, and re-conceptualizing some of the notions related to the discourse of revolution. Through a reading of a few photos, I’ll historicize the link between revolution and violence, and question its unavoidability.

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Crossing the Boundaries 2013: Call for Papers

April 26-27th, 2013
Binghamton University
A multidisciplinary, multivocal academic conference with a global geographic and broad temporal reach, presented by the Art History Graduate Student Union

Keynote Speakers:
Ariella Azoulay, Brown University
Julia Walker, Binghamton University
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DIS/PLACE: To remove or shift from its place; to put out of the proper or usual place; to remove from a position, dignity, or office; to remove, banish; to oust (something) from its place and occupy it instead; to take the place of, supplant, ‘replace.’

The Art History Graduate Student Union at Binghamton University invites submissions from any historical or disciplinary approach that consider the subject of the placement and/or displacement (of knowledge, people, groups, and objects) for the 21st Annual Crossing the Boundaries Conference.  Propelled by a longstanding commitment to bring forth exceptional critical research, this year’s conference aims to investigate shifts and transformations in global societies, while aspiring to position them in a historical perspective. Specifically, we aim to consider how technologies, migration, archiving and visibility are not only utilized by and incorporated into apparatuses of power, but also how they have been (re)presented, understood and conceptualized from pre-modern eras to the present day. Current civic and international disputes warrant an investigation of historical gatherings, modes of circulation and dissemination vis-à-vis the politics and mechanism of the visual (whether of the photographic image, technologies of surveillance, portraiture and so forth) and their possible appropriation into practices of governance.

Potential topics might include (but are not limited to):

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