Call for Papers: CTB 2015

CutandPaste

We are pleased to announce the theme for our twenty-third annual conference: Cut and Paste!

Keynote Speakers:

Andrés Mario Zervigón, Rutgers University

Kevin Hatch, Binghamton University

CALL FOR PAPERS

The phrase “cut and paste,” in its most fundamental definition, is the process of selecting and combining fragments. Inspired by an established commitment to critical research, this year’s conference aims to explore the assortment of thematic, methodological, and sociopolitical interpretations derived from the traditional concept of extracting and adhering.

The twenty-third annual Crossing The Boundaries Conference, hosted by the Art History Graduate Student Union at Binghamton University, invites submissions from any historical or disciplinary approaches that involve a literal or conceptual appropriation achieved through cutting and pasting.

Potential topics might include (but are not limited to):

  • Collage, bricolage, assemblage, montage
  • Authorship, plagiarism, imitation
  • Censorship and editing
  • Fragments / Fragmentation
  • Cultural traditions and historical change
  • Recontextualization
  • Sociopolitcal statements
  • Accumulation and composites of found objects
  • Invention or production through appropriation

Proposals for individual papers (20 minutes maximum) should be no more than 250 words in length and may be sent by email, with a current graduate level CV, to binghamtonctb@gmail.com (Attn: Proposal). We also welcome proposals for integrated panels. Panel organizers should describe the theme of the panel and send abstracts with names and affiliations of all participants along with current CVs. A panel should consist of no more than three papers, each twenty minutes in length. Deadline for submissions is January 30, 2015.

#CTB14: Conference Abstracts

A ‘Cabaret of Curiosities’: The Landscape Aesthetics of “Mondo Utah” and the Mormon Panorama
Amanda Beardsley

More than just the aestheticization of natural phenomena, the panorama has functioned as both optical surrogate for nature, simulator, and generator of affect—an apparatus for teaching people how to survey and perceive the world while also situating them in it. Such characteristics of panoramic vision have carried over into current museological practices in an effort to unveil and reconcile socio-cultural landscapes, while also encouraging tourism. This was seen specifically in the 2013 Utah biennial, “Mondo Utah,” whose title referenced the controversial genre of Mondo cinema. The biennial attempted to decipher a visual language of contemporary art specific to the region. Pavilions surveyed objects ranging from the marginal (golden life-masks and mummiforms of the Summum group), to the aggregate (work from the collective holdings of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints).

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Undergraduate Panel: Abstracts and Bios

We are delighted to launch our 22nd annual conference with a panel presented and moderated by the undergraduates of the Art History Department.

The panel will be held on April 4 in the Lower Galleries of the Binghamton University Art Museum (1-2:15pm).

Here is more information about the presenters and their talks:

Biography:

Mikey Kosowski is a sophomore who is majoring in art history and Russian studies. Mikey sees art history as a way in which he can develop a deeper and older passion, British history and visual culture, and is now beginning to explore his interests in Eastern Europe. His current research interests range from the interiors of Victorian Anglo-Catholic churches to the modern restoration of synagogue murals in Poland.

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Crossing the Boundaries 2012, ICONS: Abstracts

10:20-11:40am         Panel One

“Papal Archeology and the Catacombs: Early Christian Shrines and the Modern Italian State”

Natalie Espino, Binghamton University Department of History

During the second half of the nineteenth century, liberalism, revolution, and nation-state building challenged the spiritual authority, political power and historical prestige of the Roman Catholic Church. New ruling systems called into question the temporal sovereignty and political privileges of the clergy in general, and the papacy above all. For Italy in particular, the papacy and its temporal dominions represented the final obstacle to the unification of the peninsula and the establishment of a new capital at Rome. For the Catholic leadership, clashes with modern secular powers evoked the accounts of the ancient Roman state’s persecution of the early church. This paper examines the birth of modern Christian archaeology within this context of the nineteenth-century church-state crisis during the Italian Risorgimento. Papal-sponsored exploration of the early Christian Catacombs took place within the larger program of artistic and spiritual revival that commemorated the early Christian communities in Rome, their persecution by the Roman state, and their eventual triumph over paganism.

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