Faculty Keynote Speaker, Karen-edis Barzman

Join us for Professor Karen-edis Barzman’s talk, titled “Political Topographies and Counter-Practices of Place: A Case Study in Mapping.”

The talk will be held on Saturday, April 5, at 4:30pm (FA 258). For the complete conference schedule, click here.
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#CTB14: Meet our Participants

Meet this year’s presenters, who will join is on April 4-5, 2014. All events are free and open to the public. For more info about the schedule, click here.

Sara Champlin specializes in classical art and archaeology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison.  Her research interests include elite dining practices, hybrid architectural forms, and various social, political and economic factors that affect urban landscapes.  Her masters research at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst focused on the appropriation and re-use of Greek myth for Roman funerary contexts.  More recently she has been working with wall frescoes and floor mosaics to determine ancient systems of organizing space.  Her paper Town Planning in the West: Metapontum, Megara Hyblaea, and Akragas developed out of a graduate seminar on the topic of Greek Colonization with Professor Nicholas D. Cahill.

Nicole Wagner is currently pursuing her Ph.D. in Art History at Binghamton University. Her work focuses on Early Modern Italian painting and culture, with an emphasis on Confraternal patronage, Catholic Reformation, conventual space, and devotional art.  Nicole received her BA in Art History from the University at Geneseo and her MA in History and Museum Education from the University at Buffalo.

Rotem Rozental explores the intersections of photography, social networks and nationalism, focusing on Zionist photographic archives. She is currently pursuing her PhD in the art history department of Binghamton University. Rotem is the editor of The Shpilman Institute for Photography Blog (thesip.org), and co-artistic director of “We, Festi-conference for Creative Collectives” (2012-2013), held annually as part of the Jerusalem Season of Culture (jerusalemseason.com). She also edits the Season’s website, blog and social media. In addition, Rotem writes exhibition reviews for Arforum.com and other magazines.

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Undergraduate Panel: Abstracts and Bios

We are delighted to launch our 22nd annual conference with a panel presented and moderated by the undergraduates of the Art History Department.

The panel will be held on April 4 in the Lower Galleries of the Binghamton University Art Museum (1-2:15pm).

Here is more information about the presenters and their talks:

Biography:

Mikey Kosowski is a sophomore who is majoring in art history and Russian studies. Mikey sees art history as a way in which he can develop a deeper and older passion, British history and visual culture, and is now beginning to explore his interests in Eastern Europe. His current research interests range from the interiors of Victorian Anglo-Catholic churches to the modern restoration of synagogue murals in Poland.

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#CTB13: Meet Our Participants

For schedule and titles, click here

Amanda Beardsley is currently pursuing her Ph.D. in Art History at Binghamton University. She received her M.A. in Art History from the University of Utah where she completed a thesis entitled “This is the Place: Site-Specificity in Ernesto Pujol’s Awaiting (2010),” which explores the reconfiguration of cultural and individual identity based on the body’s relationship to geographic location. In addition to teaching several courses at the University of Utah and Utah Valley University, Amanda co-curated an exhibition of European Prints titled Collecting Knowledge: Renaissance Cabinets of Curiosity at the Utah Museum of Fine Arts in 2010. She is currently the president of the Art History Graduate Student Union at Binghamton University.

Ionit Behar is a candidate for a master’s degree in Art History, Theory, and Criticism at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Her thesis on Michael Asher investigates the strategy of displacement in his Chicago projects from 1979 at the Art Institute and the Museum of Contemporary Art. Asher strove to expose museums’ function and distribution by displacing what was already in the permanent collection rather than adding new work to the museum display. Ionit holds a BA in Art Theory from Tel Aviv University and a degree in Art Administration and Cultural Management from the Bank Boston Foundation in Montevideo. She is involved in a variety of curatorial projects in Chicago, New York City, Montevideo and Tel Aviv.

Sule Can is a second year Cultural Anthropology PhD student at State University of New York at Binghamton. She got her MA degree in Cultural Studies from Istanbul Bilgi University. Her research interests are anthropology of borders and border cities, anthropology of the Middle East, Islamic minorities in Turkey, ethnic conflicts, nationalism, imperialism and state. Her dissertation focuses on Turkish-Syrian border particularly Hatay. She looks at the ways in which border conflict and refugees impact the city from local, national and global perspectives.

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Keynote: Ariella Azoulay, “Revolutionary Moments and State Violence”

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Ariella Azoulay is an Assistant Professor of comparative literature and modern culture and media in Brown University. She will present her talk on Saturday, April 27, 2013, 6:15pm.



Abstract:

A few years ago, when I began my research on the revolutions of the 18th century, I was guided by the intuition that revolution is a special type of language, and created an archive of its different manifestations. This intuition was initially based on my reading of texts and pamphlets written by protestors deprived of civil rights – mainly women and blacks, alongside images from the same context. The archive became a laboratory for further exploration of this intuition. I started by identifying statements, forms, body gestures, grammar and rules, and re-conceptualizing some of the notions related to the discourse of revolution. Through a reading of a few photos, I’ll historicize the link between revolution and violence, and question its unavoidability.

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Keynote: Prof. Julia Walker, “Allegory/Archipelago: Crossing Berlin’s Boundaries”

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Julia Walker is Assistant Professor of Art History at Binghamton University. Her talk, titled “Allegory/Archipelago: Crossing Berlin’s Boundaries,” will be held on Friday, April 26, 2013, at 5:30pm.

Abstract:

Upon winning the commission to master plan Berlin’s new government district, Axel Schultes remarked, “the challenge posed by the competition was to coax the soul out of the Spreebogen, the genius loci, to pour its historical and spatial dimensions into the mold of a new architectural allegory.” Schultes and his partner, Charlotte Frank, had generated public enthusiasm with a design anchored by a Band des Bundes (or “ribbon of federal buildings”) spanning the Spree River twice and traversing the former boundary between east and west. Supporters saw the plan as symbolically repairing the torn urban fabric and suturing together the formerly divided city. Indeed, Schultes and Frank’s design thematized the Spreebogen’s status as a boundary that needed somehow to be crossed—a historical zone of rupture, movement, and surveillance, from the course of the Berlin Wall along the Spree to the spectral presence of Albert Speer’s imposing north-south boulevard. Yet Schultes’s reflection that the Spreebogen’s vexed history must be refigured as a “new architectural allegory” also reveals that the boundary between his plan and its precedents is theoretical as well as historical. Schultes and Frank’s postmodern approach to urban planning draws heavily on the thinking of Rem Koolhaas and O. M. Ungers, who had planned in 1977 to reconfigure Berlin as the “green archipelago,” a decentralized, fragmented, and dispersed city in which islands of architectural intensity floated in depopulated green space. In both the allegory and the archipelago, the unified city is hardly unified, but rather diffuse and inchoate.

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